Block Concert – Oct. 18, 2020, 4 p.m.

Bel Canto Block Concert

Block Concert Live Stream

Program

Hope. . . . .Ysaye M. Barnwell

Long Time Traveler. . . . .The Wailin’ Jennys
Anna Banman, Kara Longenecker and Adaylia Powers
Wade in the Water. . . . .Spiritual, arr. Mark Hayes
Alyssa Burkholder
When Faith Runs Deep. . . . .Lyndsay Taylor
Bethany Masters and Kelly Miller
The Water Is Wide. . . . .Traditional Folk Song, arr. Rollo Dilworth
Alexander Miller and Ethan Klassen
Watch What Happens from Newsies. . . . .Alan Menken and Jack Feldman
Meg Beyer

The Song We Sing. . . . .Jacob Narverud
Psalm of Life. . . . .Craig Hella Johnson
We Can Mend the Sky. . . . .Jake Runestand
Anna Banman, soloist; Ethan Klassen, djembe

How Great Thou Art. . . . .Carl Boberg
Alexander Miller and Kelly Miller
Nearer My God to Thee. . . . .Rob Roy Peery
Alyssa Burkholder and Alyssa Nolt
No One Else from Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. . . . .Dave Malloy
Erin Peters
Bring Me Little Water, Silvey. . . . .Huddie W. Ledbetter, arr. Moira Smiley
Meg Beyer, Madison Higdon, Natalie Ladd, Alyssa Nolt and Rachel Teeter

Way Over in Beulah Lan’. . . . .Traditional Spiritual, arr. Stacey V. Gibbs

2020-21 Bel Canto Singers

Personnel

Soprano

Anna Banman, Fr., Lenexa, Kan.
Bethany Masters, Fr., Mount Eaton, Ohio
Kelly Miller, Fr., Archbold, Ohio
Erin Peters, So., Hesston, Kan.
Adaylia Powers, Fr., Buhler, Kan.
Rachel Teeter, Fr., Hesston, Kan.

Alto

Alyssa Burkholder, Fr., Goessel, Kan.
Meg Beyer, Fr., Harrisonburg, Va.
Madison Higdon, So., Kalona, Iowa
Natalie Ladd, So., Hesston, Kan.
Kara Longenecker, So., Harrisonburg, Va.
Alyssa Nolt, Fr., Shickley, Neb.

Tenor

Luke Allison, So., Freeman, S.D.
Alexander Miller, So., Arlington, Kan.
Isaac Tice, Fr., Buhler, Kan.

Bass

Ethan Klassen, So., Mt. Lake, Minn.
Caleb Oesch, So., Caldwell, Idaho
Connor Pixler, Fr., Osawatomie, Kan.
Aidan Swartzendruber, Fr., Henderson, Neb.

Texts and translations

Hope. . . . .Ysaye M. Barnwell (b. 1946)

If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to pray on.
If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to walk on.
If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to work on.
If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to march on.
If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to teach on.
If we want hope to survive in this world today, then every day we’ve got to sing on.

Ysaye Barnwell is a singer and composer well known from her years singing bass in the African American a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock (1979-2013). Dr. Barnwell has led Building a Vocal Community workshops for over 30 years focused on the power of bringing people together through singing. After missing out on concerts and touring since March, Hope is a fitting piece to open our concert this afternoon. The relentless message shines through in the text and composition style of the music. Return to program


The Song We Sing. . . . .Jacob Narverud (b. 1986), Text by Robert Bode

The song we sing is meant to bring
A moment of soft weather,
Where care and worry lift away
And we can breathe together.
We seldom find a quiet space
(In public, almost never)
Yet here we sit and know we fit,
And we belong together.

For we are home (yes, everyone),
The poet and the beggar,
The lover and the rebel, too,
Are welcome here, forever.
So close your eyes and feel your hearts
Begin to beat together,
And know that we, in harmony,
Will join the Song forever.

A native of Meriden, Kansas, Jacob Narverud has composed several compositions focused on community. This work encourages us to feel our hearts beat together and join the Song forever. This analogy is perfect for our community around Hesston College that comes from many places, yet calls this place home. Return to program


Psalm of Life. . . . .Craig Hella Johnson (b. 1962), Text by Mattie Stepanek

Echo of understanding,
Silhouette of courage,
Reflection of knowledge,
Oh, sighing breath of wisdom,
Spirit my life.

I live in the shadow of doubt,
I dwell in dark of unknown,
I wonder and wander in
Mere mortal moments,
My soul seeking solace and peace.

I pray for the world in such need,
I yearn for a world with real peace,
I praise and give thanks in
The hope of tomorrow,
Beyond days of my moments on earth.

Although this text was written in 2005, it feels like it fits perfectly for 2020. The work ends with a soaring reiteration of the last stanza: “Oh, sighing breath of wisdom, Spirit my life” that eventually fades away in an echo. So too will these trying times pass by and we will give thanks in the hope of tomorrow. Return to program


We Can Mend the Sky. . . . .Jake Runestand (b. 1986), Text by Warda Mohamed

Anna Banman, soloist; Ethan Klassen, djembe

If we come together, we can mend the crack in the sky.

The text of this work comes from students at the Minnesota International Middle School which provides a safe and inclusive environment for East African immigrant students to study. Today, we will perform the final section of the work, which is a musical depiction of one’s journey as an immigrant, offering an affirmation of hope as we all embrace the diversity around us. This music has been running through my head since March when we dispersed from our campus to online learning. However, the message that comes from the text of this Somali child bears even greater importance in the wake of social and racial inequality that has come to light through this pandemic. Return to program


Way Over in Beulah Lan’. . . . .Traditional Spiritual, arr. Stacey V. Gibbs (b. 1962)

We gonna have a good, good time
Way over in Beulah Lan’.

Oh, when we get way ovuh in Beulah Lan’,
Yes, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.
Oh, we gonna have a good, good time
Oh, Lordy, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.

I’m singin’, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’,
Yes, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.
Oh, we gonna have a good, good time
Oh, Lordy, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’

Oh, we gonna walk dem golden streets way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.

Oh, we gonna drink of de Holy wine way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.

Singin’, way ovuh in Beula Lan’,
Yes, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.
Oh, we gonna have a good, good time
Oh, Lordy, way ovuh in Beulah Lan’.

Beulah is referred to in Isaiah 62:4 and in Hebrew means married. The metaphor describes the relationship between God and his people and Beulah Land projects the coming prosperity that will be enjoyed in the land of Israel. Within the context of a Spiritual, this image carries great meaning depicting an escape to the North and living in freedom. Perhaps in our current time, we may simply look to a future without masks and social distancing! Return to program